Ocean to Ocean Panama Canal Transit

subtitleCross the entire Panama Canal, an inter-oceanic waterway made possible thanks to the labor of more than 75,000 men and women who worked for 10 years, facing unprecedented challenges. Since 1914, more than 900,000 vessels have transited through the waterway, bringing commerce, cultures, and people from all corners of the world closer together.
Ocean to Ocean Panama Canal Transit
Ocean to Ocean Panama Canal Transit
Ocean to Ocean Panama Canal Transit
Ocean to Ocean Panama Canal Transit
Ocean to Ocean Panama Canal Transit
Ocean to Ocean Panama Canal Transit

Ocean to Ocean Panama Canal Transit

Highlights

Price

PRICE
  • US$255 per person plus 7% tax

subtitleCross the entire Panama Canal, an inter-oceanic waterway made possible thanks to the labor of more than 75,000 men and women who worked for 10 years, facing unprecedented challenges. Since 1914, more than 900,000 vessels have transited through the waterway, bringing commerce, cultures, and people from all corners of the world closer together.
PRICE
  • US$255 per person plus 7% tax

The Panama Canal tour starts with an early morning pick-up at your hotel in Panama City by your driver. Enjoy a short transfer to Flamenco Island, at the Causeway of Amador on the Pacific side of the canal, where our tour outfitter welcomes you for embarkation. You will first sail under the Bridge of the Americas, which rises over 100 meters above sea level and reunites the land divided during the construction of the canal, forming another link in the Pan-American Highway. Breakfast is served buffet-style. 

The Panama Canal is 80 kilometers long, from deep waters in the Pacific Ocean to deep waters in the Caribbean Sea. It was cut through the lowest and one of the narrowest saddles of the long, mountainous Isthmus that joins North and South America. The original elevation was 95 meters above sea level, where it crosses the Continental Divide.

Northbound on the Panama Canal, the first stop is at Miraflores locks, which are the tallest in the locks system due to the extreme tidal variation of the Pacific Ocean. The boat will be raised 17 meters above sea level in two steps to enter Miraflores Lake, which is almost 2 kilometers long. A transition from salt water in the Pacific Ocean to freshwater in the lock chambers and lake takes place here. Next, the ship is raised in one step, this time an additional 9 meters, at the Pedro Miguel locks. At this point, the ship will be sailing in Gatun Lake at 26 meters above sea level and entering Gaillard Cut, the narrowest section of the Panama Canal. The 13.7-kilometer-long portion of the waterway was carved through rock and shale, and it is flanked by the backbones of the Continental Divide. The original width of Gaillard Cut was 92 meters and was increased to 152 meters in the early 1970s. In order to accommodate the demands of today's transit needs, the Panama Canal Authority recently completed the monumental task of widening the cut to 192 meters in straight sections and up to 222 meters in curves. This allows for the unrestricted two-way traffic of Panamax vessels, the largest ships that fit in the Panama Canal locks. Gaillard Cut opens up into Gatun Lake, where the Chagres River flows into the waterway near the town of Gamboa, site of the Panama Canal's Dredging Division. The Chagres River has the distinction of being the only river in the world that flows into two oceans, and it is the main source of freshwater, which guarantees the operation of the waterway. 

Lunch is served onboard while enjoying views of the giant cranes and dredging equipment near Gamboa. Halfway through the voyage in Gatun Lake, you will pass by Barro Colorado Island, where the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute has been carrying out research on rainforest biodiversity since soon after this area was flooded and the lake was formed. Gatun Lake covers an area of 423 square kilometers, and the islands in it are the tops of hills and mountains that were not flooded. Gatun Lake was once the largest man-made lake in the world. Just before reaching the Gatun locks on the Caribbean side of the Panama Canal, you will see Gatun Dam. The locks at Gatun will lower the ship 26 meters to sea level in three steps, and the ship will continue along a channel to the Port of Cristobal. You will disembark in Cristobal and board a coach bus that will take you back to Flamenco Island on a 1:30-hour comfortable ride. At Flamenco Island, your driver will be waiting to take you back to your hotel.

Departure Dates:


2024

March

16

April 

20

May

18

June

15

July

20

August

17

September

21

October

19

November

16

December

21



2025

January

18

February

15

March 15

April

19

May

17

June

21

July

19

August

16

September

20

October

18

November

15

December

20


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